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Lessons Learned From Ancient Chinese Proverbs

In China, the new year celebrations coincide with the spring festival and some of the festivities are grounded in some golden rules that we should all consider, no matter the date on the calendar.

In China, the new year celebrations coincide with the spring festival and some of the festivities are grounded in some golden rules that we should all consider, no matter the date on the calendar.

Practice what you Preach

The ancient Chinese wanted good luck to shine on them. As such, in many aspects of their fascinating culture, they work to invite good luck into their lives.

One way that the Chinese people invite good luck is to speak only positive words. Negativity is not fashionable and neither are curse words, particularly during the spring when nature displays all of its glory. Happy and positive are the buzz words of the season.

Celebrating the Spring Season

In ancient Chinese homes, as in the western world, certain objects are held in high esteem. These objects deserve respect and a clean environment. During the spring festival--an event which takes place for 15 days after the date of the first new moon of the new year--spring cleaning takes place with vigor. Since the Chinese people have long believed that cleanliness invites good fortune, homes are cleaned, swept, and tended to all over China. However, once the new moon appears which took place on February 3, 2011, all of the cleaning stops for the 15 day celebratory period. Why stop cleaning? the Chinese people fear that the good luck may be inadvertently swept away! It follows that our western tradition of ‘spring cleaning’ derived from this ancient tradition.

Say it with Food

In the springtime, good luck signs come in the form of foodstuffs also. The Chinese will serve fish for many reasons including its association with promoting long life. Other foods are made into certain forms that suggest good luck. For instance, those delicious and ultra high-calorie pork-stuffed dumplings in which we have all indulged at our favorite Asian restaurants are traditionally and intentionally made in the shape of gold ingots or gold bars. The shape speaks volumes about their symbolism and pre-eminence on Chinese dinner tables.

Red is Powerful

The springtime in China is an important time of the year as people host many guests. Gift giving is a spring time tradition and the power color, red, is worn by young adults in abundance. Whether you are giving the gift of a small red trinket or wearing a red dresses, the vibrant primary color means good luck and has been an important color in Chinese culture since the ancient times.  Chinese snuff bottles, decorative screens, porcelains, and floor coverings are often highlighted with the bold color.

Ph.D. antiques appraiser, author, award-winning TV personality, and TV talk show host, Dr. Lori presents antique appraisal events nationwide, including around Tampa Bay. Dr. Lori is the star appraiser on the hit TV show "Auction Kings" on Discovery Channel airing Tuesdays at 9 p.m. Visit www.DrLoriV.com, www.Facebook.com/DoctorLori or call (888) 431-1010.

This post is contributed by a community member. The views expressed in this blog are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Patch Media Corporation. Everyone is welcome to submit a post to Patch. If you'd like to post a blog, go here to get started.

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